My Dinosaur Is a Service Animal (with Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard!)

Just because it’s a Velociraptor with knives for teeth doesn’t mean it’s not my best friend.

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RAPH: http://www.twitter.com/chestangraphael
REKHA: http://www.twitter.com/rekhalshankar
BRENNAN: https://twitter.com/brennanlm
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CAST
Chris Pratt
Bryce Dallas Howard
Raphael Chestang
Blue – Nick Celentano

Airport Travelers –
Ellie Panger
Rorrie Travis
Antonio Salgado
Danice Page
Steven Lee
Andrea Clemons
James Karroum
Laura Johnston
Ian Sollenberger
Killian Sobel

CREW
Director – Ryan Anthony Martin
Writer – Raphael Chestang
Producer – Shane Crown
Production Coordinator – Francesca McLafferty 
Editor – Sam Geer

Planet Earth Is Reading Too Far Into These Animals

David Attenborough seems insistent that he knows EXACTLY why animals are doing everything they’re doing in Planet Earth II. Maybe they’re just animals, Dave.

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RAPH: http://www.twitter.com/chestangraphael
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CAST
VO by Avery Monsen

CREW
Writer – Jessica Ross
Producer – Shane Crown
Post Production Coordinator – Marissa High
Editor – Sam Geer

7 Animals with Really Wild Tongues

They’re sticky, they’re stretchy, they’re just plain long—here are seven of the most interesting tongues in the animal kingdom!

Smarter Every Day’s video about chameleon tongues:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MtbfrCGRm8

Hosted by: Hank Green

Head to https://scishowfinds.com/ for hand selected artifacts of the universe!
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Sources:
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/05/0519_040519_tvchameleons.html
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/271/1540/761
https://www.nature.com/articles/srep18625
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/160105-chameleons-tongue-speed-animals-science/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/08/21/bat-with-record-breaking-tongue-found-in-the-bolivian-jungle/?utm_term=.9dd67dc5a557
https://academic.oup.com/jmammal/article/86/3/457/837127
https://www.nature.com/articles/444701a

https://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/blog/2013/12/10/woodpeckers-hammer-without-headaches/
http://mentalfloss.com/article/30731/why-dont-woodpeckers-get-brain-damage

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/03/15/pangolins-13-facts-about-the-worlds-most-hunted-animal/
https://www.livescience.com/57200-facts-about-pangolins.html
http://www.jstor.org/stable/1379083

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/reptiles/a/alligator-snapping-turtle/
https://www.stlzoo.org/animals/abouttheanimals/reptiles/turtlesandtortoises/alligatorsnappingturtle
http://www.jstor.org/stable/40060476
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1439-0310.1979.tb01022.x
https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/alligator-snapping-turtle
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jmor.1051940308
http://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(16)00068-5/pdf

http://mentalfloss.com/article/27517/tongue-length-and-other-things-you-should-know-about-giraffes
https://giraffeconservation.org/faqs/
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1095-6433(15)00123-3
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/zoo.20180

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/b/blue-whale/
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-science-whales/open-wide-and-say-ah-secret-of-gaping-whale-mouths-revealed-idUSKBN0NP1RD20150504
http://www.cell.com/current-biology/pdf/S0960-9822(15)00284-5.pdf
http://www.jstor.org/stable/27859477
http://jeb.biologists.org/content/214/1/131
———-
Images:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mellers.chameleon.bristol.zoo.arp.jpg
https://d1o50x50snmhul.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2006/12/dn10721-1_788.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/80270393@N06/8468756758
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Alligator_snapping_turtle_(1).jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Namibie_Etosha_Girafe_01.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Anim1754_-_Flickr_-_NOAA_Photo_Library.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Giraffe%27s_tongue.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ustad_Mansur_Chameleon.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Alligator_Snapping_Turtle_(5687008503).jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PSM_V49_D359_Oriole_and_tongues_of_woodpecker_and_sapsucker.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Natural_History,_Birds_-_Woodpecker_skull.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Macrochelys_temminckii_baiting.webm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHUpwaAxe2E

Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning | Deep Look

(FYI – This episode is a *bit* more bloody that usual – especially a little after the 2-minute mark. Just letting you know in case flesh wounds aren’t your thing)

The same blood-sucking leeches feared by hikers and swimmers are making a comeback… in hospitals. Once used for questionable treatments, leeches now help doctors complete complex surgeries to reattach severed body parts.

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DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

Leeches get a bad rap—but they might not deserve it. Yes, they’re creepy crawly blood-suckers. And they can instill an almost primal sense of disgust and revulsion. Humphrey Bogart’s character in the 1951 film The African Queen even went so far as to call them “filthy little devils.”

But the humble leech is making a comeback. Contrary to the typical, derogatory definition of a human “leech,” this critter is increasingly playing a key role as a sidekick for scientists and doctors, simply by being its bloodthirsty self.

Distant cousins of the earthworm, most leech species are parasites that feed on the blood of animals and humans alike. They are often found in freshwater and navigate either by swimming or by inching themselves along, using two suckers—one at each end of their body—to anchor themselves.

Upon reaching an unsuspecting host, a leech will surreptitiously attach itself and begin to feed. It uses a triangular set of three teeth to cut in, and secretes a suite of chemicals to thin the blood and numb the skin so its presence goes undetected.

—+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1921659/take-two-leeches-and-call-me-in-the-morning

—+ For more information:
David Weisblat at UC Berkeley studies leeches development and evolution
https://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/weisblat/research.html

Biologists recently reported that leeches in that region can provide a valuable snapshot of which animals are present in a particular area
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14772000.2018.1433729?journalCode=tsab20&

—+ More Great Deep Look episodes:

Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker | Deep Look
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpJNeGqExrc

For Pacific Mole Crabs It’s Dig or Die | Deep Look
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfoYD8pAsMw

Praying Mantis Love is Waaay Weirder Than You Think | Deep Look
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHf47gI8w04&t=83s

—+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Above the Noise:

Cow Burps Are Warming the Planet | Reactions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnRFUSGz_ZM

What a Dinosaur Looks Like Under a Microscope | Eons
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rvgiDXc12k
Hawking Radiation | Space Time
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPKj0YnKANw

—+ Follow KQED Science:
KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science
Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience

—+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks | Deep Look

Why can’t you just flick a tick? Because it attaches to you with a mouth covered in hooks, while it fattens up on your blood. For days. But don’t worry – there *is* a way to pull it out.

SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt

DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

Spring is here. Unfortunately for hikers and picnickers out enjoying the warmer weather, the new season is prime time for ticks, which can transmit bacteria that cause Lyme disease.

How they latch on – and stay on – is a feat of engineering that scientists have been piecing together. Once you know how a tick’s mouth works, you understand why it’s impossible to simply flick a tick.

The key to their success is a menacing mouth covered in hooks that they use to get under the surface of our skin and attach themselves for several days while they fatten up on our blood.

“Ticks have a lovely, evolved mouth part for doing exactly what they need to do, which is extended feeding,” said Kerry Padgett, supervising public health biologist at the California Department of Public Health in Richmond. “They’re not like a mosquito that can just put their mouth parts in and out nicely, like a hypodermic needle.”

Instead, a tick digs in using two sets of hooks. Each set looks like a hand with three hooked fingers. The hooks dig in and wriggle into the skin. Then these “hands” bend in unison to perform approximately half-a-dozen breaststrokes that pull skin out of the way so the tick can push in a long stubby part called the hypostome.

“It’s almost like swimming into the skin,” said Dania Richter, a biologist at the Technische Universität in Braunschweig, Germany, who has studied the mechanism closely. “By bending the hooks it’s engaging the skin. It’s pulling the skin when it retracts.”

The bottom of their long hypostome is also covered in rows of hooks that give it the look of a chainsaw. Those hooks act like mini-harpoons, anchoring the tick to us for the long haul.

“They’re teeth that are backwards facing, similar to one of those gates you would drive over but you’re not allowed to back up or else you’d puncture your tires,” said Padgett.

— How to remove a tick.
Kerry Padgett, at the California Department of Public Health, recommends grabbing the tick close to the skin using a pair of fine tweezers and simply pulling straight up.

“No twisting or jerking,” she said. “Use a smooth motion pulling up.”

Padgett warned against using other strategies.

“Don’t use Vaseline or try to burn the tick or use a cotton swab soaked in soft soap or any of these other techniques that might take a little longer or might not work at all,” she said. “You really want to remove the tick as soon as possible.”

— What happens if the mouth of a tick breaks off in your skin?
Don’t worry if the tick’s mouth parts stay behind when you pull.

“The mouth parts are not going to transmit disease to people,” said Padgett.

If the mouth stayed behind in your skin, it will eventually work its way out, sort of like a splinter does, she said. Clean the bite area with soap and water and apply antibiotic ointment.

—+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1920972/how-ticks-dig-in-with-a-mouth-full-of-hooks

—+ For more information:
Centers for Disease Control information on Lyme disease:
https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

Mosquito & Vector Control District for San Mateo County, California:
https://www.smcmvcd.org/ticks

—+ More Great Deep Look episodes:

How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU

So … Sometimes Fireflies Eat Other Fireflies
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWdCMFvgFbo

Meet the Dust Mites, Tiny Roommates That Feast On Your Skin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACrLMtPyRM0

—+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios!

Above the Noise: Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5l0cjsZS-eM

It’s Okay To Be Smart: Inside an ICE CAVE! – Nature’s Most Beautiful Blue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7LKm9jtm8I

—+ Follow KQED Science:
KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science
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—+ About KQED
KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

Ode to a Dog

In which John talks about his family’s dog, Fireball Wilson Roberts Green.

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So … Sometimes Fireflies Eat Other Fireflies | Deep Look

Most firefly flashes are pure romance, a sexy form of skywriting. But one variety copies the mating signals of others to lure them to their demise.

SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt

DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

Most of the blinking signals that fireflies send out are intended to attract mates. But researchers are finding out that in some cases, these romantic overtures are not all wine and roses.

Females of one firefly group, the genus Photuris, have learned to copy other fireflies’ flashes to attract the males of those species. When one arrives, she pounces, first sucking his blood, then devouring his insides.

These “femme fatale” fireflies live throughout the Eastern U.S alongside the fireflies they target. They can develop widely varying light shows to target whatever species are in the area.

The predatory habits of Photuris are just one example of how much individual firefly signals can differ from one another.

The male Common Eastern Firefly, for example, is known for his fish hook-shaped aerial maneuver, which he repeats at six-second intervals. That characteristic move has earned the species the nickname “Big Dipper.”

The male Big Dipper hopes this bit of skywriting will get him noticed by females hiding in the grass. If the female likes what she sees, her reply comes as a single pulse from her smaller, heart-shaped lantern. That’s his invitation to land and mate.

Most firefly interactions follow the same pattern, with roving males advertising themselves to concealed females. Within a species, the back-and-forth signals are so reliable that it’s easy to attract the male fireflies with even a simple decoy.

Firefly light is biochemical. But fireflies like the Big Dippers do much more with chemistry than just make light. They can mix together an array of other compounds, including invisible pheromones for mating, and others called lucibufagins (“loosa-BOOF-ajins”) that ward off predators like spiders and birds.

At some point, the Photuris “femme fatale” fireflies lost the ability to make their own lucibufagins. So instead of chemistry, these bigger, stronger fireflies became adept at imitation, and evolved to turn into insect vampires to take these valuable compounds from other fireflies to boost their own defenses.

And it works. In experiments, predators avoided Photuris fireflies that had recently preyed on other fireflies.

— Where do fireflies live?

There are fireflies worldwide, but in the U.S., you’ll find them in the Midwest and Eastern U.S. There are a few species in the West, including the California Pink Glow-worm.

— Why do fireflies flash?

Mostly, it’s to attract mates. One sex, usually the male, uses a more elaborate flash pattern to get the attention of the opposite sex. Then the female signals her interest with a simpler flash.

— Why do fireflies glow after they die?

The chemicals in the firefly that make light, luciferin and luciferase, remain viable after it dies, and the reaction that creates the light thrives on oxygen, which is of course plentiful in the air.

—+ Read the entire article on KQED Science:

https://ww2.kqed.org/2018/02/27/so-sometimes-fireflies-eat-other-fireflies

—+ For more information:

Join Fireflyers International: https://fireflyersinternational.net/

—+ More Great Deep Look episodes:

Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Snail Sex
https://youtu.be/UOcLaI44TXA

Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker
https://youtu.be/NpJNeGqExrc

—+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios!

PBS Eons: When Giant Fungi Ruled
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-G64DagHuOg

Origin Of Everything: Why Do We Eat Artificial Flavors?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNaJ31EV13U

—+ Follow KQED Science:

KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science
Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience

—+ About KQED

KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

Thoughts from VERY Dead Animals

In which Hank goes to a paleontological museum and it’s GREAT!

Kallie, Blake, and Hank take you on a journey through the history of life: http://www.youtube.com/eons

I am aware that it is peculiar that I have now met two charismatic young women working at amazing museums featuring dead stuff at The University of Montana, but this is the world we live in, I guess!

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Subscribe to our newsletter! http://nerdfighteria.com/newsletter/
And join the community at http://nerdfighteria.com http://effyeahnerdfighters.com
Help transcribe videos – http://nerdfighteria.info
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John’s tumblr – http://fishingboatproceeds.tumblr.com
Hank’s twitter – http://twitter.com/hankgreen
Hank’s tumblr – http://edwardspoonhands.tumblr.com

Mermaid Melissa’s Beautiful Blue Fins & Tail Fluke! Relaxing Dreamy Background Footage & Music

Video direct link: https://youtu.be/Nwv5TfYY1TE
Subscribe: http://youtube.com/MermaidMelissaPage
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Relaxing Music And Background Soothing Calming Positive Mermaid Melissa Underwater Visuals For Deep Meditation.
Meditation & Sleep Music Videos are the perfect relaxing way to help you go to sleep, or relieve stress, insomnia, and encourage lucid dreaming. Soft calm music for sleeping uses delta waves and soft instrumental music to help you achieve deep relaxation, and fall asleep. This peaceful flowing video can be used as background meditation, relaxation music, peaceful mindset and for falling into a deep sleep fast. Let the soothing and calming visuals and sounds help you enjoy relaxing deep zen meditation or soothing sleep.
Mermaid underwater nature footage and music for deep sleep to help cure insomnia, positive energy healing chakra, stress relief soothing zen meditation, anxiety cleanse healing delta waves, lucid happy dreaming, pure clean positive enery vibration for serotonin, dopamine, and endorphin release.

Galaxy [Smooth Mystical Trap Beat] by OZSOUND Music provided by OZSOUND Channel: www.youtube.com/ozsound Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Why Echidnas Are Evolutionary Misfits

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It’s pretty well known that Australia is home to some strange animals, but echidnas are especially weird evolutionary misfits.

Hosted by: Hank Green
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Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow
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Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Kelly Landrum Jones, Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطا الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick Merrithew, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz
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Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet?
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Sources:
http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/animals/how-the-platypus-and-echidna-lost-their-stomachs.aspx
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/many-animals-including-the-platypus-lost-their-stomachs-180948103/
http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2013/12/03/how-the-platypus-and-a-quarter-of-fishes-lost-their-stomachs/
http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/animals/echidna.aspx
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0006070#s1
http://www.publish.csiro.au/ZO/ZO09037
https://eprints.utas.edu.au/2320/1/Nicol_et_al._2007_The_life_history_of_an_egg-laying_mammal2C_the_echidna_Ecoscience.pdf
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0531556508001629
http://reptilepark.com.au/animals/mammals/echidna/
http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2011/01/11/3110568.htm
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jcp.1040670108/abstract
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5399094/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2441467/
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/obl4he/vertebratediversity/monotremes.html
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/522847?seq=2#page_scan_tab_contents
http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/resources/nature/Factsheet3Echidnas.pdf
http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1591&context=hbspapers
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/290413985_Marsupial_and_Monotreme_Evolution_And_Biogeography

Image Sources:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heteropoda_venatoria_-_female_at_Mechode_Padur.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:CSIRO_ScienceImage_10356_Superb_Lyrebird.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Monotreme_reproductive_organs.png