8 Survival Myths That Will Definitely Make Things Worse

You might think you know how to survive if you end up stranded in the wild, but those tips you read on the internet might just make things worse!

Some tips seem too good to be true, and they are. Others are ingrained enough to be common knowledge, except they’re wrong.

Hosted by: Hank Green

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Sources:

https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/desert-cloudscape-gm482377760-69992289
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/snowy-empty-driving-road-in-the-winter-iceland-gm657042568-119691245

Eating snow
http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=1619
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/01/23/463959512/so-you-want-to-eat-snow-is-it-safe-we-asked-scientists
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/winter-scene-thaw-gm628875450-111753311

Cactus juice
https://www.britannica.com/story/can-you-drink-water-from-a-cactus
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC148931/
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/jsfa.2740350410
https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+1202
https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/photosynthesis-in-plants/photorespiration–c3-c4-cam-plants/a/c3-c4-and-cam-plants-agriculture
https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/calcium-oxalate-stone
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ferocactus_wislizeni_(6541006057).jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Prickly_Pear_Closeup.jpg
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/field-of-cactus-gm145997810-6138805

Urine and blood
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2008/05/the_yellow_liquid_diet.html
https://www.livescience.com/15899-drinking-blood-safe.html
https://www.hemochromatosis.org/#overview
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/beer-with-forth-gm183243456-14730136
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/blood-dripping-gm157509239-10684671

Moss
http://mentalfloss.com/article/56243/does-moss-really-only-grow-north-side-trees
http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=2975
http://projects.ncsu.edu/project/bio181de/Lab/plant_phylogeny/non-vascular.html
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/strong-roots-of-old-tree-covered-with-green-moss-close-up-gm866600452-144131965
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/the-gree-hell-mossy-roots-and-trunks-in-deep-forest-gm912425688-251189812

Alcohol
http://mentalfloss.com/article/32256/does-drinking-alcohol-really-keep-you-warm-when-its-cold-out
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2318781
https://www.princeton.edu/~oa/safety/hypocold.shtml
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/close-up-view-of-the-bottle-in-ice-gm133897014-18274727
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/young-woman-drinking-a-tea-on-the-city-gm628664428-111676911

Frostbite
https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/926249-overview#a3
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothermia/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20352688
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/man-with-a-tan-beanie-and-red-scarf-trying-to-warm-up-gm142527503-17874723

Snakebite
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMra013477
https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/pathophysiological-and-pharmacological-effects-of-snake-venom-components-molecular-targets-2161-0495.1000-190.php?aid=25709
http://www.umich.edu/~elements/fogler&gurmen/html/web_mod/cobra/avenom.htm
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/venomous-snake-bites-mans-finger-gm939901378-256963981
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/isolated-diamondback-rattlesnake-gm91032724-5881298

Jellyfish
https://www.britannica.com/science/nematocyst#ref1013437
http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6651/9/3/105/htm?xid=PS_smithsonian
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/how-fix-jellyfish-sting-180963582/
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/whats-behind-that-jellyfish-sting-2844876/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4728541/
https://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/14/health/14real.html
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3773479/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Moon_jellyfish_at_Gota_Sagher.JPG
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/stingers-gm172300393-3544362

Thumbnail:
https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/caveman-gm157533887-11308958

3 Ways Humans Have Literally Put Themselves Into Art

Artists are notorious for pouring their heart and soul into their work, but historically, they also put some of their literal body parts into it as well!

Hosted by: Olivia Gordon

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Sources:

https://www.britannica.com/art/illuminated-manuscript
http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/11954/1/a-baker-04-pigments.pdf
http://web.ceu.hu/medstud/manual/MMM/frame18.html
https://books.google.com/books?id=yFS_Fulva8IC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Materials,+Methods,+and+Masterpieces+of+Medieval+Art&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjx68rjj_fZAhUC-2MKHdkpB40Q6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=ear%20wax&f=false

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/jun/13/from-crushed-bugs-to-cow-urine-the-history-of-colours-in-pictures
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Regina_Keijzer/publication/271200741_Searching_for_blue_Experiments_with_woad_fermentation_vats_and_an_explanation_of_the_colours_through_dye_analysis/links/54c0d6d60cf21674ce9ff5e8/Searching-for-blue-Experiments-with-woad-fermentation-vats-and-an-explanation-of-the-colours-through-dye-analysis.pdf
https://www.nature.com/news/1998/981126/full/news981126-7.html
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/from-gunpowder-to-teeth-whitener-the-science-behind-historic-uses-of-urine-442390/

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/symbiartic/pinch-of-pigment-mummy-brown/
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/09/mummy-art-painting-delacroix-pigment-ancient-Egypt/
http://www.theconservationcenter.com/article/2015/11/16/pigment-of-the-month-mummy-brown
http://www.artinsociety.com/the-life-and-death-of-mummy-brown.html
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/ground-mummies-were-once-ingredient-paint-180950350/

Why Do Some Shots Make Your Arm Hurt So Much?

From MMR boosters to tetanus, you’ll probably get a lot of shots in your life. And one thing you might notice is that some of them don’t feel like much, but some of them can make your arm reallllly sore! Why is that?

Hosted by: Olivia Gordon

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Sources:
https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-do-some-vaccines-hurt-more-than-others-1473096166
http://www.cmaj.ca/content/182/18/E843.full
https://www.popsci.com/why-does-my-arm-hurt-day-after-i-get-my-flu-shot#page-2
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1118997/
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X14016673?via%3Dihub
http://www.chicagotribune.com/brandpublishing/leahdurantlaw/ct-what-a-misplaced-needle-can-mean-for-you-20160914-htmlstory.html
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/vac-admin.html
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/general-recs/administration.html
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1570021/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769648/
http://www.cochrane.org/CD010720/SYMPT_needle-size-for-vaccination-procedures-in-children-and-adolescents
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.4161/hv.4.1.4747
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0952791517300869?via%3Dihub
http://www.patientcareonline.com/vaccines/vaccine-adjuvants-little-pain-worth-gain/page/0/1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4494348/
https://journals.lww.com/pidj/Fulltext/2015/02000/Pain_in_Adolescent_Girls_Receiving_Human.18.aspx
https://academic.oup.com/jpids/article/4/4/396/2580461
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/adjuvants.html

Future Raph’s Only Regret

Raphael has traveled through time to warn present-time Raph about… healthy living?

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CAST
Raphael Chestang
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Grant O’Brien

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Can You Keep Donating and Regrowing Your Liver?

Fun Fact: people can donate over half of their liver, and the tissue will grow back within a year! Knowing that, it seems pretty logical to assume that we could just keep donating and regrowing our livers over and over again, but is that really the case?

Special Thanks: Dr. George Michalopoulos, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Medical Center

Hosted by: Hank Green

Head to https://scishowfinds.com/ for hand selected artifacts of the universe!
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Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow
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Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Jerry Perez, Lazarus G, Kelly Landrum Jones, Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz
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Sources:
Dr. George Michalopoulos, personal communication
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/276/5309/60
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/toxic-hepatitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20352202
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02889179
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hep.20969/full
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hep.20214/full
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2701258/
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1432-2277.2005.00158.x/full
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3976740/

Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning | Deep Look

(FYI – This episode is a *bit* more bloody that usual – especially a little after the 2-minute mark. Just letting you know in case flesh wounds aren’t your thing)

The same blood-sucking leeches feared by hikers and swimmers are making a comeback… in hospitals. Once used for questionable treatments, leeches now help doctors complete complex surgeries to reattach severed body parts.

SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt

DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

Leeches get a bad rap—but they might not deserve it. Yes, they’re creepy crawly blood-suckers. And they can instill an almost primal sense of disgust and revulsion. Humphrey Bogart’s character in the 1951 film The African Queen even went so far as to call them “filthy little devils.”

But the humble leech is making a comeback. Contrary to the typical, derogatory definition of a human “leech,” this critter is increasingly playing a key role as a sidekick for scientists and doctors, simply by being its bloodthirsty self.

Distant cousins of the earthworm, most leech species are parasites that feed on the blood of animals and humans alike. They are often found in freshwater and navigate either by swimming or by inching themselves along, using two suckers—one at each end of their body—to anchor themselves.

Upon reaching an unsuspecting host, a leech will surreptitiously attach itself and begin to feed. It uses a triangular set of three teeth to cut in, and secretes a suite of chemicals to thin the blood and numb the skin so its presence goes undetected.

—+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1921659/take-two-leeches-and-call-me-in-the-morning

—+ For more information:
David Weisblat at UC Berkeley studies leeches development and evolution
https://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/weisblat/research.html

Biologists recently reported that leeches in that region can provide a valuable snapshot of which animals are present in a particular area
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14772000.2018.1433729?journalCode=tsab20&

—+ More Great Deep Look episodes:

Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker | Deep Look
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpJNeGqExrc

For Pacific Mole Crabs It’s Dig or Die | Deep Look
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfoYD8pAsMw

Praying Mantis Love is Waaay Weirder Than You Think | Deep Look
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHf47gI8w04&t=83s

—+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Above the Noise:

Cow Burps Are Warming the Planet | Reactions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnRFUSGz_ZM

What a Dinosaur Looks Like Under a Microscope | Eons
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rvgiDXc12k
Hawking Radiation | Space Time
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPKj0YnKANw

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KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science
Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com
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—+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks | Deep Look

Why can’t you just flick a tick? Because it attaches to you with a mouth covered in hooks, while it fattens up on your blood. For days. But don’t worry – there *is* a way to pull it out.

SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt

DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

Spring is here. Unfortunately for hikers and picnickers out enjoying the warmer weather, the new season is prime time for ticks, which can transmit bacteria that cause Lyme disease.

How they latch on – and stay on – is a feat of engineering that scientists have been piecing together. Once you know how a tick’s mouth works, you understand why it’s impossible to simply flick a tick.

The key to their success is a menacing mouth covered in hooks that they use to get under the surface of our skin and attach themselves for several days while they fatten up on our blood.

“Ticks have a lovely, evolved mouth part for doing exactly what they need to do, which is extended feeding,” said Kerry Padgett, supervising public health biologist at the California Department of Public Health in Richmond. “They’re not like a mosquito that can just put their mouth parts in and out nicely, like a hypodermic needle.”

Instead, a tick digs in using two sets of hooks. Each set looks like a hand with three hooked fingers. The hooks dig in and wriggle into the skin. Then these “hands” bend in unison to perform approximately half-a-dozen breaststrokes that pull skin out of the way so the tick can push in a long stubby part called the hypostome.

“It’s almost like swimming into the skin,” said Dania Richter, a biologist at the Technische Universität in Braunschweig, Germany, who has studied the mechanism closely. “By bending the hooks it’s engaging the skin. It’s pulling the skin when it retracts.”

The bottom of their long hypostome is also covered in rows of hooks that give it the look of a chainsaw. Those hooks act like mini-harpoons, anchoring the tick to us for the long haul.

“They’re teeth that are backwards facing, similar to one of those gates you would drive over but you’re not allowed to back up or else you’d puncture your tires,” said Padgett.

— How to remove a tick.
Kerry Padgett, at the California Department of Public Health, recommends grabbing the tick close to the skin using a pair of fine tweezers and simply pulling straight up.

“No twisting or jerking,” she said. “Use a smooth motion pulling up.”

Padgett warned against using other strategies.

“Don’t use Vaseline or try to burn the tick or use a cotton swab soaked in soft soap or any of these other techniques that might take a little longer or might not work at all,” she said. “You really want to remove the tick as soon as possible.”

— What happens if the mouth of a tick breaks off in your skin?
Don’t worry if the tick’s mouth parts stay behind when you pull.

“The mouth parts are not going to transmit disease to people,” said Padgett.

If the mouth stayed behind in your skin, it will eventually work its way out, sort of like a splinter does, she said. Clean the bite area with soap and water and apply antibiotic ointment.

—+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1920972/how-ticks-dig-in-with-a-mouth-full-of-hooks

—+ For more information:
Centers for Disease Control information on Lyme disease:
https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

Mosquito & Vector Control District for San Mateo County, California:
https://www.smcmvcd.org/ticks

—+ More Great Deep Look episodes:

How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU

So … Sometimes Fireflies Eat Other Fireflies
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWdCMFvgFbo

Meet the Dust Mites, Tiny Roommates That Feast On Your Skin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACrLMtPyRM0

—+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios!

Above the Noise: Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5l0cjsZS-eM

It’s Okay To Be Smart: Inside an ICE CAVE! – Nature’s Most Beautiful Blue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7LKm9jtm8I

—+ Follow KQED Science:
KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science
Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience

—+ About KQED
KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

Finally! A Female Killer

You go (to jail) girl!

Of course the chief detective doesn’t support a serial killer, but she has to admit, it’s nice to finally see some gender balance.

CH Shorts – Original sketches, music videos, and pop culture parodies spanning the last CollegeHumor decade.

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Yaniv Elani
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The Key to an Artificial Heart … and Open-Heart Surgery

Scientists have been trying to pull blood out of the body and put it back in again since the early 1800s, but bypass machines haven’t been easy to get right.

Hosted by: Michael Aranda
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Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Kelly Landrum Jones, Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطا الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick Merrithew, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz
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Sources:

https://books.google.com/books?id=UPUCDAAAQBAJ&lpg=PA119&dq=vitreous%20fluid%20center%20gel%20edges&pg=PA119#v=onepage&q&f=false
https://thesis.library.caltech.edu/974/3/CSN_CH3.pdf
https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/vitreous-humour
https://www.jci.org/articles/view/10706/pdf
https://nei.nih.gov/health/floaters/floaters
https://www.healthline.com/human-body-maps/eye-vitreous-and-aqueous-humor#seoBlock
http://www.aclm.org.uk/index.php?url=04_FAQs/default.php&Q=3
https://www.healthline.com/human-body-maps/cornea

Images:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eye-diagram_bg.svg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:FundusPhotoAntha.jpg